Program for the 3rd Symposium on Ecological Networks and 3rd Symposium on Molecular Analysis

Last changed: 01 August 2017
Krabbspindel.jpg

The programme for the 3rd Symposium on Ecological Networks and 3rd Symposium on Molecular Analysis of Trophic Interactions is available here. You can download the programme as a pdf on the button below or read the program directly on this page.

The program is designed with three purposes in mind:

  1. To disseminate the latest molecular techniques to network ecologists, and of network theory to molecular ecologists,
  2. To promote interactions between researchers focusing on terrestrial and aquatic systems, and
  3. To maximize interactions between senior and emerging researchers at different stages of their career.

 A general overview of the onference structure can be found here.

MONDAY: Web structure versus functioning: a new understanding

8:45-9:00 Welcome
9:00-10:00
Predicting the architecture of biodiversity
Dominique Gravel
10:00-10:30 COFFEE
10:30-11:30
The roles, function and impacts of humans in complex ecological networks: data and theory
Jennifer  Dunne
11:30-11:50 Assessing ecosystem services in ecological networks – the role of species traits
Anna Eklöf
11:50-12:10

Which traits of marine species explain the most variation in their food-web roles?
Alyssa Cirtwill

12:10-13:30 LUNCH
13:30-14:30
Body-masses, food-web structure, animal diversity and ecosystem functioning
Ulrich Brose
14:30-14:50 Exploring the organization of multiplex ecological networks
Vincent Miele
14:50-15:10

Integrative machine learning and verification of trophic networks
Alireza Tamaddoni-Nezhad

15:10-15:40 COFFEE
15:40-16:00

Identifying significant trophic interaction modifications for population dynamics in ecological communities
Christopher Terry James

16:00-16:20

Robustness of weighted bipartite networks and skew due to structurally correlated extinctions
Miranda Bane

16:20-16:40

Beyond species numbers: the effects of habitat loss on multi-trophic communities
Daniel Montoya

16:40-17:00 Enough is enough: How to sample plant-pollinator networks to make relative comparisons
Ignasi Bartomeus

TUESDAY: Reconstructing food web structure and dynamics – from food webs to full interaction webs

8:55-9:00 Introduction with practical details
9:00-10:00
Empirical study of complex food webs in tropical forests using experiments
Vojtech Novotny
10:00-10:30 COFFEE
10:30-11:30
Ecological networks – past, present and future
Jane Memmott
11:30-11:50

Food webs at the landscape scale: are we missing the wood for the trees?
Talya Hackett     

11:50-12:10

Correlated loss of ecosystem services in coupled mutualistic networks
Jörg Albrecht

12:10-13:30 LUNCH
13:30-14:30
Individual variation in trophic interactions shape natural communities
Anna Gårdmark
14:30-14:50

Effects of land use on cross-habitat resource subsidies in stream-riparian networks
Brendan McKie 

14:50-15:10

Investigating the influence of shared enemies in diverse tropical tree communities
Harriet Downey

15:10-15:40 COFFEE
15:40-16:00

Apparent competition drives community-wide parasitism rates and changes in host abundance across ecosystem boundaries: predicting future states of complex systems with quantitative food webs
Carol Frost

16:00-16:20

Food web ecology can inform biodiversity-ecosystem functioning relationships
Riccardo Bommarco

 16:20-16:40

Does plant community relatedness explain context dependency on keystone plant species roles?
Kate Pereira Maia

 16:40-17:00   

Artificial light effects on plant-pollinator networks
Colin Fontaine

 17:00-20:00  POSTER SESSION starting with flash talks

WEDNESDAY: Dissecting trophic interactions by molecular techniques

8:55-9:00 Introduction with practical details
9:00-10:00
The wonderful(?) world of eDNA
Tom Gilbert
10:00-10:30 COFFEE
10:30-12:10
MTI introductory workshop
Workshop aimed at bridging the two worlds’ of ecologists into networks and molecular ecologists into trophic interactions. The introductory presentation will cover topics spanning the characteristics of MTI samples; sampling & storage; DNA extraction; targeted genes/types of DNA; PCR; diagnostic & sequence-based identification; interpretation of molecularly derived trophic data; MTI Do’s and Don’ts. After this presentation, the plenary speakers plus the presenting person will be answering questions from the audience.
12:10-13:30 LUNCH
13:30-14:30
Co-occurrences among microbes producing and reducing inorganic nitrogen compounds within the nitrogen cycle
Sara Hallin
14:30-14:50

Integrating Next Generation Sequencing into food web ecology
Samuel North

14:50-15:10

Seeing is believing? The effects of molecular information on the structure of food webs
Chunchao Zhu

15:10-15:40 COFFEE
15:40-16:00

Next-generation Global Biomonitoring – large-scale, automated reconstruction of ecological networks
David Bohan

16:00-16:20

Adaptive network rewiring, MOTU clustering pipelines, and applications for molecular network ecology
David Hemprich-Bennett  

16:20-16:40

Untangling trophic interactions in marine plankton communities through DNA barcoding approaches
Sara Zamora-Terol

16:40-17:00

Computer simulation shows that DNA metabarcoding can provide quantitative estimates of the relative abundance of species in heterogeneous mixtures
Josep Pinol

THURSDAY: New findings achieved through molecular dissection

8:55-9:00 Introduction with practical details
 9:00-10:00
How did we get here and where we are going? From detecting specific prey to constructing more complex networks
William Symondson
10:00-10:30 COFFEE
10:30-10:50

Beyond Moose: resource partitioning patterns in novel ungulate assemblages
Joris Cromsigt

10:50-11:10

Factors affecting diet diversity in a climate sensitive alpine small mammal in Himalaya
Sabuj Bhattacharyy

11:10-11:30

Detection and distribution of otters and their prey on the river Don in South Yorkshire
Deborah Dawson

11:30-11:50

A pilot dietary study using multiple primers to overcome prey detection biases in the generalist insectivore Pyrenean desman
Amaiur Esnaola Illarreta

11:50-12:10

Multitrophic interactions in a plant diversity experiment analyzed by gut content sequencing
Julia Tiede

12:10-13:30 LUNCH
13:30-14:30
Making DNA count: defining and pushing the technical limits of dietary DNA metabarcoding
Bruce Deagle
14:30-14:50

Unravelling seed dispersal by frugivorous animals through DNA barcoding
Juan Pedro González-Varo

14:50-15:10

Using a combination of molecular gut content and stable isotope analyses to unravel the connections between marine and terrestrial food webs
Peter Hambäck 

15:10-15:40 COFFEE
15:40-16:00

Using molecular methods to establish a new food web study system: wild Drosophila, their parasites and symbionts
Jan Hrcek

16:00-16:20

Using nested metabarcoding to assess changes in herbivore-parasitoid food webs following insecticide application to control invasive species
James Kitson

16:20-16:40

Investigating the feeding preferences of two blood-feeding terrestrial leeches, using invertebrate-derived DNA analysis
Rosie Drinkwater

16:40-17:00

Molecular gut profiling of the globally significant pelagic tunicate Dolioletta gegenbauri in the US South Atlantic Bight continental shelf: what are they eating?
Tina L. Walters

 17:00-20:00  POSTER SESSION starting with flash talks
FRIDAY: Applied trophic interactions (Biocontrol in the morning, Conservation in the afternoon)
8:55-9:00 Introduction with practical details
 9:00-10:00
Molecular analysis of trophic interactions: defining and evaluating host-parasitoid associations in biocontrol programmes
Tara Gariepy
10:00-10:30  COFFEE
10:30-10:50

A simple and cost-effective molecular way to track predation on Drosophila suzukii in the field
Sarah Wolf

10:50-11:10

Do predator food webs change in response to fertilization type?
Oskar Rubbmark

11:10-11:30

Can landscape context affect intraguild predation of cereal aphid natural enemies?
Blas Lavandero

11:30-11:50

The richness of predators containing striped cucumber beetle (Acalymma vittatum) DNA predicts pest suppression
Mary Gardiner

11:50-12:10

Analysis of spatio-temporal food resource exploitation by aphid predators may help to promote pest control services
Lolita Ammann

12:10-13:30 LUNCH
13:30-14:30
Conservation, DNA, and ecological networks: methods and challenges
Elisabeth Clare
14:30-14:50

Distribution, ecology and role of a parasitic ciliate on commercial panaeid shrimp in the US Southeast Atlantic: insights gained using molecular interaction tools
Marc E. Frischer

14:50-15:10

El Niño effects on nestedness and modularity of tropical seed dispersal networks revealed by DNA barcoding
Hernani F. M. de Oliveira

15:10-15:40

COFFEE

15:40-16:00

A DNA metabarcoding approach to analyse diet and foraging habitat preference in Bechstein’s bat Myotis bechsteinii
Helen Hipperson

16:00-16:20

Prey DNA detectability half-lives: turning PCR positives into quantitative predation rates
Bastian Egeter

16:20-16:40

Phytophagous insects’ gut microbiome as facilitator of invasiveness?
Stéphane Boyer

16:40-17:00

Untangling molecular foodwebs to investigate the impacts of invasive non-native species on invertebrate communities in the UK
Marco Benucci


Contact

Tomas Roslin, Professor Insect Ecology
Department of Ecology, SLU
tomas.roslin@slu.se 018-672383

Page editor: cajsa.lithell@slu.se