The Electrofishing boat Elritsan

Last changed: 07 December 2020
Electrofishing boat on its maiden voyage. Photo.

SLU Aqua's electric fishing boat Elritsan is used for environmental monitoring of fish in larger watercourses and in lakes where net fishing and traditional electric fishing are not feasible. With this test fishing method, we broaden our opportunities to research fish and fishing, while we can examine fish in a gentle way. Elritsan is stationed at the Institute of Freshwater Research in Stockholm.

Gentle monitoring method

Electrofishing is widely used to assess fish assemblages. Electro fishing from a boat is a gentle test fishing method. Electric current attracts and stuns the fish that are caught with nets. After species identification, measurement and a moment of recovery, the fish are released back into the water.

Our electrofishing boat Elritsan (transl. The Minnow) is stationed at the Institute of Freshwater Research in Stockholm. Inquiries about the boat are made to Helena Strömberg or Magnus Dahlberg.

Courses in test fishing

Do you want to use the electrofishing method, or the monitoring method using testfishing nets? Then you need the knowledge of how to do it. We offer courses in test fishing and experimental animal science.

SLU Aqua offers courses in test fishing and experimental animal science.

Launching of the electrofishing boat Elritsan. Photo.
The electrofishing boat Elritsan is being launched in Lake Mälaren next to the Institute of Freshwater Research in Stockholm. The boat can be used for surveys of fish in larger watercourses and in lakes. Photo: Sofia Bureborn, SLU.
Electrofishing boat Elritsan on Lake Mälaren. Photo.
Our electrofishing boat Elritsan is used for environmental monitoring in waters where net fishing and traditional electrofishing are not feasible. Photo: Sofia Bureborn, SLU.
Staff on board the electrofishing on the electrofishing boat Elritsan on the Lake Mälaren. Photo.
Electrofishing is a gentle research method. Electric current attracts and stuns the fish, that can be caught with a net and be released after examination.
Two people catching fish. Photo.
The fish are caught with nets and the species are determined, measured and released back into the water. Photo: Sofia Bureborn, SLU.

Contact

Helena Strömberg, Environmental Assessment Specialist
Department of Aquatic Resources, Institute of Freshwater Research, SLU
helena.stromberg@slu.se, +46 10 47 84 281

Magnus Dahlberg, Environmental Monitoring and Assessment Analyst
Department of Aquatic Resources, Institute of Freshwater Research, SLU
magnus.dahlberg@slu.se, +46 10 478 42 22

Page editor: teresa.soler@slu.se