The Landscape Ecology Network

Last changed: 01 June 2017
landscape-ecology.jpg

Landscape effects! All local biological processes are affected by its surroundings. Most ecologist therefore acknowledge that the dynamics of local populations and communities needs to be viewed in a context of the surrounding landscape.

Consequently, there is research that relates to many aspects of landscape ecology at all units at the department of Ecology. Actually, many researchers at the department could be viewed as landscape ecologists in some sense and together we cover verything from metapopulation and metacommunity dynamics to the study of spatial and temporaldistributionof diversity. Also, we cover a wide range of organisms such as lichens, mosses and plants, insects, spiders, mammals and birds. We mainly work in forest, agricultural, urban and archipelago landscapes. The general mix of organisms, the different ecological traditions and views make the “Landscape Ecology Network” a good “melting pot” for new ideas and interesting discussions.

Research interest

Questions that interest us are (a non-exhaustive list) e.g. :

  • The relation of alpha and beta-diversity in landscape gradients from intensively to extensively managed ones (i.e. farmland and forested landscapes)
  • Expected effects of landsharing vs. land sparing in landscape gradients for the conservation and management of species
  • Landscape filtering of communities and interspecific interactions (competition, predation)
  • Demography, population dynamics and longterm trends in heterogeneous - homogeneous landscapes
  • What is a landscape effects on a local community? -  a reflection of a process or a confounding association?

With us, you will be joining a research environment where research on landscape related questions will developed, where previous thoughts are continuously questions, and where you will find much support for your own landscape related research.

Related pages: