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BI1295

Sustainable Plant Production - from Molecular to Field Scale

Additional course evaluations for BI1295

Academic year 2020/2021

Sustainable Plant Production - from Molecular to Field Scale (BI1295-40104) 2021-03-24 - 2021-06-06

Academic year 2020/2021

Sustainable Plant Production - from Molecular to Field Scale (BI1295-M4103) 2021-03-24 - 2021-06-06

Academic year 2020/2021

Sustainable Plant Production - from Molecular to Field Scale (BI1295-M4104) 2021-03-24 - 2021-06-06

Academic year 2020/2021

Sustainable Plant Production - from Molecular to Field Scale (BI1295-M4105) 2021-03-24 - 2021-06-06

Academic year 2020/2021

Sustainable Plant Production - from Molecular to Field Scale (BI1295-40103) 2021-03-24 - 2021-06-06

Academic year 2020/2021

Sustainable Plant Production - from Molecular to Field Scale (BI1295-40105) 2021-03-24 - 2021-06-06

Academic year 2019/2020

Sustainable Plant Production - from Molecular to Field Scale (BI1295-40010) 2020-03-25 - 2020-06-07

Academic year 2019/2020

Sustainable Plant Production - from Molecular to Field Scale (BI1295-40011) 2020-03-25 - 2020-06-07

Academic year 2019/2020

Sustainable Plant Production - from Molecular to Field Scale (BI1295-40012) 2020-03-25 - 2020-06-07

Academic year 2018/2019

Sustainable Plant Production - from Molecular to Field Scale (BI1295-40002) 2019-03-26 - 2019-06-09

Academic year 2018/2019

Sustainable Plant Production - from Molecular to Field Scale (BI1295-40003) 2019-03-26 - 2019-06-09

Academic year 2018/2019

Sustainable Plant Production - from Molecular to Field Scale (BI1295-40004) 2019-03-26 - 2019-06-09

BI1295 Sustainable Plant Production - from Molecular to Field Scale, 15.0 Credits

Hållbar växtproduktion från molekylär- till beståndsnivå

Syllabus approved

2017-10-25

Subjects

Biology

Education cycle

Master’s level

Modules

Title Credits Code
Exam 10.00 1002
Project 5.00 1003

Advanced study in the main field

Second cycle, only first-cycle courses as entry requirements(A1N)

Grading scale

5:Pass with Distinction, 4:Pass with Credit, 3:Pass, U:Fail The requirements for attaining different grades are described in the course assessment criteria which are contained in a supplement to the course syllabus. Current information on assessment criteria shall be made available at the start of the course.

Language

English

Prior knowledge

Knowledge equivalent to 120 credits at basic level including
- 60 credits biology or
- 60 credits Forest Sciences including 15 credits chemistry
- 60 credits Horticultural Science including 15 credits chemistry
- 60 credits Agricultural Science including 15 credits in chemistry
and
- English 6

Objectives

The course offers a synthesis and further deepening of the basic principles of sustainable production in agriculture, horticulture, and forestry. The factors and processes that affect the sustainability and multifunctionality of production systems are integrated, by considering the different scales from the molecular to the stand level. The course also provides knowledge of the associated relevant methodologies. The course presents a review of the relevant theoretical basis and a set of specific examples relative to selected plants and production systems.

On completion of the course, the student will be able to:
- describe the origin of cultivated plants, the basic breeding strategies for them, and their molecular and physiological features relevant for production
- discuss the effects of plant features and growing conditions on the production, yield and resource use efficiency of cultivated plants
- evaluate the impacts of different management solutions on the production and yield of cultivated plants, with reference to different criteria for sustainability and multifunctionality
- plan and execute the research activities necessary to answer specific research questions in the subject area, under limited guidance
- present the results of these research activities in a scientifically-appropriate way

Content

The course offers a synthesis and further deepening of knowledge in plant production research, as well as the integration of different methodologies emplyed in, among others, plant physiology, plant breeding and process-based modeling. The course provides a solid foundation for research in the subject area, but also professional training. The course consists of lectures and compulsory seminars and excercises, as well as a group project. The lectures review the basics of the origin, breeding, physiology and production of cultivated plants, and link them to soil ecology and nutrient dynamics at the field level. The effects of disturbances on plant production and possible improvement strategies are also described, both qualitatively and quantitatively. These aspects are discussed at different organizational levels. In addition, the complexity and multifunctionality of production systems are explored with reference to different systems, focusing on sustainability and the inherent tradeoffs. The lectures provide also an overview of important tools and methods for research. The seminars and exercises train the ability to read scientific literature and extract key information, identify knowledge gaps, and present and compare different points of view. The group work trains the students in different research methods and offers the opportunity of practical applications of the knowledge acquired during the rest of the course. The seminars and exercises include compulsory activities.

Formats and requirements for examination

Written and oral exam with passing grade; participation in the compulsory seminars and exercises; written report and oral presentation of the group project work.
  • If the student fails a test, the examiner may give the student a supplementary assignment, provided this is possible and there is reason to do so.
  • If the student has been granted special educational support because of a disability, the examiner has the right to offer the student an adapted test, or provide an alternative assessment.
  • If changes are made to this course syllabus, or if the course is closed, SLU shall decide on transitional rules for examination of students admitted under this syllabus but who have not yet passed the course.
  • For the examination of a degree project (independent project), the examiner may also allow the student to add supplemental information after the deadline. For more information on this, please refer to the regulations for education at Bachelor's and Master's level.

Other information

  • The right to take part in teaching and/or supervision only applies to the course date to which the student has been admitted and registered on.
  • If there are special reasons, the student may take part in course components that require compulsory attendance at a later date. For more information on this, please refer to the regulations for education at Bachelor's and Master's level.

Additional information

The course is part of the Master program in Plant biology for sustainable production and the program in Agriculture – soil and plant science.

SLU is environmentally certified according to ISO 14001. A large part of our courses
cover knowledge and skills that contribute positively to the environment. To further
strengthen this, we have specific environmental goals for the education. Students are
welcome to suggest actions regarding the course’s content and implementation that lead
to improvements for the environment. For more information, see webpage www.slu.se.

Responsible department

Department of Crop Production Ecology

Further information

Determined by: Vice dekan S-fak

SLU BI1295 – Grading criteria 2022

Grading scale: 5: Pass with Distinction; 4: Pass with Credit; 3: Pass; U: Fail

Two thirds of the course consists of lectures/seminars/exercises and one third of the course is project work. The first part is mostly linked to the intended learning outcomes (ILOs) 1-3 (see below) and is examined through a written exam. The project component is mostly linked to ILOs 4-5 (see below) and examined through an assessment of the student's work, written group project report, and oral group project presentation.

To pass the course, the grades of the written exam and the project work need to be either equal or greater than 3 (i.e., both parts of the course need to be passed). The final grade is the rounded value of the weighed mean of the grades for the written exam and the project work.

Participation in the compulsory activities (including the seminars) is required to pass the course (for grade 3). If a student is absent, the student should get in contact with the teacher responsible for the missed part to discuss a make-up task. This task should be carried out independently and handed in as a written report in order to achieve a pass, in agreement with the teacher responsible for that part.

Grading criteria for the written exam

The written exam will examine the student's knowledge of the topics covered during the course lectures and seminars, thus testing primarily whether the student has met the first three ILOs (listed on the course syllabus):

  1. describe the origin of cultivated plants, the basic breeding strategies for them, and their molecular and physiological features relevant for production
  2. discuss the effects of plant features and growing conditions on the production, yield and resource use efficiency of cultivated plants
  3. evaluate the impacts of different management solutions on the production and yield of cultivated plants, with reference to different criteria for sustainability and multifunctionality.

Each course lecture and seminar is associated to one (main) ILO (see course schedule). To fulfill the ILOs, the student needs to achieve at least 45% of the maximum score for each ILO.

The final grade of the written exam will be determined as follows:

Grade 5: Achievement of at least 85 % of the maximum score of the whole written exam.

Grade 4: Achievement of at least 70 % of the maximum score of the whole written exam.

Grade 3: Achievement of at least 55 % of the maximum score of the whole written exam.

Grading criteria for the project work

The assessment of the project work primarily aims at determining whether the student has met ILOs 4 and 5 (listed on the course syllabus):

  1. plan research activities necessary to answer specific research questions in the subject area, under limited guidance
  2. present the results in a scientifically-appropriate way

The following weights will be used to evaluate the different aspects of the project work: the final written report (75%) and the oral presentation (25%). (Percentages refer to the grading of the project work only. The project work grade is then averaged with the written exam grade, as specified on p. 1.)

Written report (75%)

The written report will be graded to assess the student's ability to explain the connection between the project work and the state of the art (building on literature review, course lectures and seminars), to present the experiment and its design, as well as the demonstrated analytical understanding and reflections and writing quality (form and language).

Grade 5: Demonstrate advanced understanding of the subject through application in project work and thorough review of relevant scientific literature. Provide original, significant and correct experimental design with respect to the main hypotheses of the project work. Provide insightful and thorough discussion of experimental plan. Use existing scientific literature to place the outlined experimental plan in the context of current published theory. Good use of figures and graphics combined with concise text in proper scientific tone, without errors in grammar or spelling. Appropriate referencing to existing literature.

Grade 4: Demonstrate adequate understanding of the connections between the state of the art and the application in project work, with a review of relevant scientific literature. Provide correct and significant experimental design with respect to the main hypotheses of the project work. Provide discussion of the experimental plan. Use existing scientific literature to place the outlined experimental plan in the context of previously published theory. Good use of figures and graphics combined with concise text in proper scientific tone. Appropriate referencing to existing literature.

Grade 3: Demonstrate a limited understanding of the connections between the state of the art and the application in project work, with a limited review of relevant scientific literature. Provide correct experimental design with respect to the main hypothesis of the project work. Discussion of the experimental design with minimal referencing to existing literature. Use correctly figures and graphics combined with concise text.

Oral presentation (25%)

The oral presentation will be assessed for clarity of the presentation and visuals.

Grade 5: Presents clearly, in a well-structured way, and in a scientifically appropriate tone the project hypotheses, methods and their implications. Excellent management of time. Responds to questions from the audience.

Grade 4: Presents clearly and in a well-structured way the project hypotheses, methods and their implications. Good management of time

Grade 3: Presents the project hypotheses, methods and main results.

1) The use of hypothesis in ecology
Author: Grogan P
2) bibliometrix: An R-tool for comprehensive science mapping analysis
Author: Aria M
3) Global food system emissions could preclude achieving the 1.5° and 2°C climate change targets
Author: Clark et al.
4) Plant Physiological Ecology (chapter 2)
Author: Lambers et al.
5) Physiological Plant Ecology (page 111-119)
Author: Larcher W
6) Improving farming systems in Northern European conditions
Author: Peltonen-Sainio et al.
7) Photosynthetic efficiency and crop yield
Author: Xu D-Q et al.
8) Improving crop yield
Author: Eisenhut M et al.
9) Trade-offs in plants and the prospects for breeding using modern biotechnology
Author: Weih M
10) Towards making willows potential bio-resources in the South: Northern Salix hybrids can cope with warm and dry climate when irrigated
Author: Bonosi L et al.
11) Climate change in Europe. 3. Impact on agriculture and forestry. A review
Author: Lavalle C et al.
12) Sensitivity of European wheat to extreme weather
Author: Mäkinen H et al.
13) Weed Science – Principles and practices (chapter 1 and 2)
Author: Monaco TJ et al.
14) An ecological future for weed science to sustain crop production and the environment. A review
Author: MacLaren C et al.
15) The molecular genetics of crop domestication
Author: Doebley JF et al.
16) Application of genomics-assisted breeding for generation of climate resilient crops: progress and prospects
Author: Kole C et al.
17) Essentials of Genetics
Author: Klug WS et al.
18) Food Security: The Challenge of Feeding 9 Billion People
Author: Godfray CJ et al.
19) Achieving food security for one million sub-Saharan African poor through push–pull innovation by 2020
Author: Khan Z et al.
20) Test of semiochemicals and a resistant wheat variety for Russian wheat aphid management in South Africa
Author: Prinsloo G et al.
21) The Rhizosphere: A Playground and Battlefield for Soilborne Pathogens and Beneficial Microorganisms
Author: Raaijmakers J M et al.
22) The Microbiome of the Leaf Surface of Arabidopsis Protects against a Fungal Pathogen
Author: Ritpitakphong U et al.
23) Plant Pathology Principles
Author: Guest D I et al.
24) Fungal and Oomycete Diseases
Author: Tör M et al.
25) Induced systemic resistance by beneficial microbes
Author: Pieterse et al.
26) Origin and evolution of the plant immune system
Author: Han G-Z
27) Plant-growth promoting rhizobacteria
Author: Lugtenberg B et al.
28) Understanding and exploiting plant beneficial microbes
Author: Finkel et al.
29) Plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR): emergence in agriculture
Author: Bhattacharyya PN et al.
30) How plant root exudates shape the nitrogen cycle
Author: Coskun D et al.
31) Towards food, feed and energy crops mitigating climate change
Author: Philippot L et al.
32) Nitrogen transformations
Author: Robertson et al.
33) Potential benefits of early vigor and changes in phenology in wheat to adapt to warmer and drier climates
Author: Ludwig F et al.
34) Environmental modelling - An introduction (chapter 1 and 2)
Author: Smith et al.
35) Daisy: an open soil-crop-atmosphere system model (pages 313-317)
Author: Abrahamsen et al.
36) The microbial nitrogen-cycling network
Author: Kuypers M et al.
37) Going back to the roots: the microbial ecology of the rhizosphere
Author: Philippot L et al.
38) Molecular and genetic basis of plant macronutrient use efficiency: concepts, opportunities, and challenges
Author: Lopez-Arredondo DL et al.
39) Role of nutrient-efficient plants for improving crop yields: bridging plant ecology, physiology, and molecular biology
Author: Weih M et al
40) Agroecosystems, nitrogen-use efficiency, and nitrogen management
Author: Cassman KG et al.
41) Genetic and environmental effects on crop development determining adaptation and yield, Ch 12
Author: Slafer GA et al.
42) Agroecology and the design of climate change-resilient farming systems
Author: Altieri et al.
43) Options for keeping the food system within environmental limits
Author: Sprinhmann M et al.
44) Applying plant ecological knowledge to increase agricultural sustainability
Author: Weiner

Course facts

The course is offered as an independent course: Yes The course is offered as a programme course: Plant Biology for Sustainable Production - Master´s programme Agriculture Programme - Soil/Plant Agriculture Programme - Soil/Plant (270hec) Forest Science - Master´s Programme Tuition fee: Tuition fee only for non-EU/EEA/Switzerland citizens: 38054 SEK Cycle: Master’s level
Subject: Biology
Course code: BI1295 Application code: SLU-40032 Distance course: No Language: English Responsible department: Department of Crop Production Ecology Pace: 100%