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NA0180

Topics in contemporary applied agricultural economics I

Information from the course leader

A warm welcome to the Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences and the course Topics in contemporary applied agricultural economics I!

Below, you will find general information about the student account, registration for the course and other practical information.

The student account

You will need your student account to access e.g. your e-mail, Ladok and Canvas. For information regarding how to create your student account, follow this link: https://student.slu.se/en/study-support/it-support/support/new-student---start/

Registration for the course

Self-registration for the course is done in Ladok between 2022-08-15 and 2022-08-29. Remember that you must be admitted and registered in Ladok to be able take the course. Having access to Canvas does not mean you are registered in the course and without registration, you are risking losing your place in the course. If you have been admitted to the course with conditions, you need to send your credit list to the course leader who will review it and decide if you can register. Do this as soon as possible as reviewing credits may take a few days due to the course start.

Educational support

If you are entitled extra educational support, please inform the course leader at the start of the course so that special arrangements can be made.

For educational support for an exam, see instructions in the exam registration in Ladok Student. You need to register for alternative exam arrangements no later than 15 workings days prior to the examination day. More information here: https://student.slu.se/en/study-support/study-support/funka/.

Discontinuation of a course

If you want to discontinue the course, you should immediately notify the educational administrators at econ-edu@slu.se, who in turn will inform the course leader and register a non-completion of the course in Ladok after your approval. You are also able to register an early non-completion of the course (within three weeks after course start) in Ladok yourself.

Exams

You need to register for exams in Ladok. The registration closes 10 workings days prior to the exam. You can find your anonymity code in Ladok Student. It's not possible to register for the exam after the deadline has passed.

On Wednesdays between 12:30-14:30 we have an exam hand out at the department (Ulls hus, 4th floor). Please remember to bring your ID-card.

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Do not hesitate to contact us at econ-edu@slu.se if you have any questions!

Kind regards,

The educational administrators

Course evaluation

The course evaluation is not yet activated

The course evaluation is open between 2022-10-24 and 2022-11-14

Additional course evaluations for NA0180

Academic year 2022/2023

Topics in contemporary applied agricultural economics I (NA0180-M1150)

2022-08-29 - 2022-10-31

Academic year 2021/2022

Topics in contemporary applied agricultural economics I (NA0180-10251)

2021-08-30 - 2021-11-01

Academic year 2021/2022

Topics in contemporary applied agricultural economics I (NA0180-M1251)

2021-08-30 - 2021-11-01

Academic year 2020/2021

Topics in contemporary applied agricultural economics I (NA0180-10214)

2020-08-31 - 2020-11-01

Academic year 2019/2020

Topics in contemporary applied agricultural economics I (NA0180-10181)

2019-09-02 - 2019-10-31

Academic year 2018/2019

Topics in contemporary applied agricultural economics I (NA0180-10232)

2018-09-03 - 2018-11-05

Syllabus

NA0180 Topics in contemporary applied agricultural economics I, 7.5 Credits

Aktuella teman inom tillämpad agrar ekonomi I

Subjects

Economics

Education cycle

Master’s level

Modules

Title Credits Code
Single module 7.5 0201

Advanced study in the main field

Second cycle, has only first-cycle course/s as entry requirements(A1N)

Grading scale

5:Pass with Distinction, 4:Pass with Credit, 3:Pass, U:Fail The requirements for attaining different grades are described in the course assessment criteria which are contained in a supplement to the course syllabus. Current information on assessment criteria shall be made available at the start of the course.

Language

English

Prior knowledge

180 hp, of which at least 90 hp in Economics. Knowledge equivalent to English 6.

Objectives

The course aims at providing students with insights into contemporary research in the subject of agricultural economics, regarding current questions, applications and research methods.



After successful completion of the course, students will be able to:



- Describe current research topics in the subject of agricultural economics.

- Discuss how current research topics contribute to solving current problems in the agricultural sector.

- Apply a current research methodology in the field of agricultural economics.

Content

The course is conducted by means of a compulsory seminar part, where the current research in the field of agricultural economics is addressed through a focus on newly published literature in the field. Furthermore, the course is conducted by means of a method part, where students through a compulsory project learn to apply a current research method in the field of agricultural economics.



The course contains a review of current research topics and methods in the field of agricultural economics. The students also receive training in the practical application of a current method in the field of agricultural economics.

Formats and requirements for examination

Passed exam.

Passed Project.

Participation in compulsory seminars.
  • If the student fails a test, the examiner may give the student a supplementary assignment, provided this is possible and there is reason to do so.
  • If the student has been granted special educational support because of a disability, the examiner has the right to offer the student an adapted test, or provide an alternative assessment.
  • If changes are made to this course syllabus, or if the course is closed, SLU shall decide on transitional rules for examination of students admitted under this syllabus but who have not yet passed the course.
  • For the examination of a degree project (independent project), the examiner may also allow the student to add supplemental information after the deadline. For more information on this, please refer to the regulations for education at Bachelor's and Master's level.

Other information

  • The right to take part in teaching and/or supervision only applies to the course date to which the student has been admitted and registered on.
  • If there are special reasons, the student may take part in course components that require compulsory attendance at a later date. For more information on this, please refer to the regulations for education at Bachelor's and Master's level.

Responsible department

Department of Economics

Further information

Determined by: Programnämnden för utbildning inom naturresurser och jordbruk (PN - NJ)
Replaces: NA0175

Grading criteria

To obtain grade “3”, the student should be able to:

  • Describe current research topics in the subject of agricultural economics;
  • Discuss how current research topics contribute to solving current problems in the agricultural sector;
  • Apply a current research methodology in the field of agricultural economics.

To obtain grade “4” the students should be able to demonstrate good knowledge and skills in relation to the requirements for grade “3”.

To obtain grade “5” the students should be able to demonstrate very good knowledge and skills in relation to the requirements for grade “3”.

The exams will be graded, using the following intervals: fail, Grade “3”: at least 60% of the total points at the exam; grade “4”: at least 75% of the total points at the exam; grade “5”: at least 90% of the total points at the exam.

The term papers will be graded, using the following intervals: fail, grade “3” pass, and grade “4” pass with distinction, using the learning outcomes of the course as a basis for the grading.

The final grade at the course is determined according to the following:

Grade “3”: Exam grade 3 and term paper grade 3, seminars: passed seminar assignments and active participation in mandatory seminars.

Grade “4”: Exam grade 4 and term paper grade 3, or exam grade 3 and term paper grade 4, or exam grade 5 and term paper grade 3, seminars: passed seminar assignments and active participation in mandatory seminars.

Grade “5”: Exam grade 5 and term paper grade 4, seminars: passed seminar assignments and active participation in mandatory seminars.

Grade “4” and “5” can only be obtained at the first exam and the first re-exam offered by SLU.

Litterature list

Reading list, Topics in contemporary applied agricultural economics I

Future scenarios

FAO (2018). The future of food and agriculture – alternative pathways to 2050. Rome.

Eco-efficiency and sustainable resource use

  1. Färe, R., Grosskopf, S., Lovell, C. A. K., & Yaisawarng, S. (1993). Derivation of Shadow Prices for Undesirable Outputs - a Distance Function-Approach. The Review of Economics and Statistics, 75(2), 374–380. DOI: 10.2307/2109448 https://www.jstor.org/stable/2109448

  2. Reinhard, S., Lovell, C. A. K., & Thijssen, G. (2002). Analysis of environmental efficiency variation. American Journal of Agricultural Economics, 84(4), 1054–1065. https://doi.org/Doi 10.1111/1467-8276.00053

  3. Färe, R., Grosskopf, S., Noh, D.-W. W., & Weber, W. (2005). Characteristics of a polluting technology: theory and practice. Journal of Econometrics, 126(2), 469–492. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jeconom.2004.05.010

  4. Cuesta, R. a., Lovell, C. A. K. A. K., Zofío, J. L., & Zofio, J. L. (2009). Environmental efficiency measurement with translog distance functions: A parametric approach. Ecological Economics, 68(8–9), 2232–2242. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ecolecon.2009.02.001

  5. Picazo-Tadeo, A. J., Beltrán-Esteve, M., & Gómez-Limón, J. A. (2012). Assessing eco-efficiency with directional distance functions. European Journal of Operational Research, 220(3), 798–809. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ejor.2012.02.025

  6. Pérez Urdiales, M., Lansink, A. O., & Wall, A. (2016). Eco-efficiency Among Dairy Farmers: The Importance of Socio-economic Characteristics and Farmer Attitudes. Environmental and Resource Economics, 64(4), 559–574. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10640-015-9885-1

  7. A. Eder, K. Salhofer, and E. Scheichel, Land tenure, soil conservation, and farm performance: An eco-efficiency analysis of Austrian crop farms, Ecol. Econ., vol. 180, 2021 https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ecolecon.2020.106861

Positive Mathematical Programming

  1. Arata, L, Donati, M, Sckokai, P and Arfini, F (2017). Incorporating risk in a positive mathematical programming framework: a dual approach. The Australian Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, 61: 265-284. https://doi.org/10.1111/1467-8489.12199
  2. Buysse J, Van Huylenbroeck G, Lauwers L (2007) Normative, positive and econometric mathematical programming as tools for incorporation of multifunctionality in agricultural policy modelling. Agr Ecosyst Environ 120(1):70–81. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.agee.2006.03.035
  3. Heckelei, T, and Wolff, H (2003) Estimation of constrained optimization models for agricultural supply analysis based on generalized maximum entropy. European Review of Agricultural Economics, 30(1):27-50. https://doi.org/10.1093/erae/30.1.27
  4. Howitt RE (1995) Positive mathematical programming. Am J Agr Econ 77(2):329–342
  5. Jansson, T and Waldo, S (2021). Managing Marine Mammals and Fisheries: A Calibrated Programming Model for the Seal‑Fishery Interaction in Sweden. Environmental and Resource Economics, 81: 501–530. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10640-021-00637-y
  6. Mérel P, Bucaram S (2010) Exact calibration of programming models of agricultural supply against exogenous supply elasticities. Eur Rev Agric Econ 37(3):395–418
  7. Röhm, O and Dabbert, S (2003) Integrating Agri-Environmental Programs into Regional Production Models: An Extension of Positive Mathematical Programming. American Journal of Agricultural Economics, 85(1): 254-265. https://doi.org/10.1111/1467-8276.00117

Consumer Preferences and food choice behavior

  1. Andersen, L. M. (2011). Animal Welfare and Eggs - Cheap Talk or Money on the Counter? Journal of Agricultural Economics 62: 565–584.

  2. Ankamah-Yeboah, I., Asche, F., Bronnmann, J., Nielsen, M., and Nielsen, R. (2020). Consumer Preference Heterogeneity and Preference Segmentation: The Case of Ecolabeled Salmon in Danish Retail Sales. Marine Resource Economics 35: 159–176.

  3. Carlsson, F., Kataria, M., Lampi, E., Nyberg, E., and Sterner, T. (2021). Red, yellow, or green? Do consumers’ choices of food products depend on the label design? European Review of Agricultural Economics : jbab036.

  4. Crosetto, P., Lacroix, A., Muller, L., and Ruffieux, B. (2020). Nutritional and economic impact of five alternative front-of-pack nutritional labels: experimental evidence. European Review of Agricultural Economics 47: 785–818.

  5. Denver, S., Christensen, T., and Nordström, J. (2021). Consumer preferences for low-salt foods: a Danish case study based on a comprehensive supermarket intervention. Public Health Nutrition 24: 3956–3965.

  6. Muringai, V., Fan, X., and Goddard, E. (2020). Canadian consumer acceptance of gene-edited versus genetically modified potatoes: A choice experiment approach. Canadian Journal of Agricultural Economics 68: 47–63.

  7. Rousu, M. C., and Lusk, J. L. (2009). Valuing information on GM foods in a WTA market: What information is most valuable? AgBioForum 12: 226–231.

Animal Health and Welfare Papers

  1. Adamie, B. A., Uehleke, R., Hansson, H., Mußhoff, O., & Hüttel, S. (2022). Dairy cow welfare measures: Can production economic data help? Sustainable Production and Consumption, 32, 296–305. https://doi.org/10.1016/J.SPC.2022.04.032

  2. Owusu-Sekyere, E., Hansson, H., & Telezhenko, E. (2022). Use and non-use values to explain farmers’ motivation for the provision of animal welfare. European Review of Agricultural Economics, 49(2), 499–525. https://doi.org/10.1093/erae/jbab012

  3. Guy, J. H., Cain, P. J., Seddon, Y. M., Baxter, E. M., & Edwards, S. A. (2012). Economic evaluation of high welfare indoor farrowing systems for pigs. Animal Welfare, 21(SUPPL. 1), 19–24. https://doi.org/10.7120/096272812X13345905673520

  4. Bornett, H. L. I., Guy, J. H., & Cain, P. J. (2003). Impact of animal welfare on costs and viability of pig production in the UK. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 16: 163–186, 2003

  5. Ahmadi, V., Stott, A. W., Baxter, E. M., Lawrence, A. B., & Edwards, S. A. (2011). Animal welfare and economic optimisation of farrowing systems. Animal Welfare, Volume 20, Number 1, February 2011, pp. 57-67(11).

  6. Jensen, T. B., Baadsgaard, N. P., Houe, H., Toft, N., & Østergaard, S. (2008). The association between disease and profitability in individual finishing boars at a test station. Livestock Science, 117(1), 101–108. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.livsci.2007.12.003

Course facts

The course is offered as an independent course: Yes Tuition fee: Tuition fee only for non-EU/EEA/Switzerland citizens: 13082 SEK Cycle: Master’s level
Subject: Economics
Course code: NA0180 Application code: SLU-10150 Location: Uppsala Distance course: No Language: English Responsible department: Department of Economics Pace: 50%