SLU news

Project receives funding for communicate risks with alien species in a changing climate

Published: 02 October 2019
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Invasion of alien species is one of the greatest threats to biodiversity and the threat is expected to increase with climate change. Costs for controlling and eradicating invasive species in Sweden today amounts to between 1.1 and 4.5 billion SEK annually.

Private domestic gardens are important gateways for invasive species to Sweden. Today, guidelines for how to communicate effectively and inclusively with private domestic garden owners on the threat from invasive species are lacking.

The overall aim of the project is to use innovative methods for co-production of evidence-based guidelines for communications so that they contain the information needed for effective decision-making and that the users can access and comprehend.

Higher impact is expected from the experts´ communications when based on guidelines based on evidence as well as the communication needs of the receivers. How big the impact will be measured in the project.

The project will be based on the Swedish Species Information Centre’s recently published risk classification of alien species and the results of two recent garden projects and will be made in collaboration between the Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences with the Swedish Species Information Centre, Lund University, Swedish biosphere areas, and the Swedish Environmental Protection Agency (SEPA).

The results generated will be implemented in society and disseminated widely through national and international networks and will be facilitated by the participation of the Swedish Biosphere Programme and the SEPA.

Coordinator: Prof. Kristina Blennow, SLU-Alnarp 

Facts:

News at Formas website (Swe)

The project will be based on the Swedish Species Information Centre’s recently published risk classification of alien species and the results of two recent garden projects and will be made in collaboration between the Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences with the Swedish Species Information Centre, Lund University, Swedish biosphere areas, and the Swedish Environmental Protection Agency (SEPA). The results generated will be implemented in society and disseminated widely through national and international networks and will be facilitated by the participation of the Swedish Biospere Programme and the SEPA.


Contact

Kristina Blennow
Professor at the Department of Landscape Architecture, Planning and Management 
Telephone: 040-415230
E-mail: kristina.blennow@slu.se

Page editor: catherine.kihlstrom@slu.se