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Undervisningshuset, Sal L, Uppsala

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Linley Chiwona Karltun: A Cultural Ecology of Food Preference - “same-same but different”

Summary

I first heard the expression “same-same but different” in Thailand in 2004. I thought it was such a lovely expression highlighting on one hand our sameness and on the other our difference. Little did I know that one day that concept would be the very essence of my research. Cultural ecology refers to cultural similarities defined by adaptations to similar environmental conditions. However, because environmental conditions are unpredictable, cultures can change in many ways and different directions. Cultures may change to be more similar or to be quite dissimilar. In September 2015 the world leaders adopted the post 2015 development agenda with 17 new goals known as the sustainable development goals (SDG). The SDG’s are a universal call to action to end poverty, protect the planet and ensure that all people enjoy peace and prosperity. Of these SDG’s  goal 2 is “End hunger, achieve food security and improved nutrition, and promote sustainable agriculture”. The Declaration of the Second International Conference on Nutrition held in 2014 in Rome, recognizes that: “family farmers and small holders, notably women farmers, play an important role in reducing malnutrition and should be supported by integrated and multi-sectoral public policies, as appropriate, that raise their productive capacity and incomes and strengthen their resilience”. 

My work has centred on poverty reduction and food security with a particular emphasis on cassava as a crop and resource for poor women’s strategies for securing household reproduction. My work has made three main contributions: i.) a cultural ecology of food preference and it’s relationships with local level plant selection, ii.) participatory interdisciplinary methodologies that allow scientists to co-produce knowledge with small-scale, resource poor farmers, and iii.) the development of global, interdisciplinary networks that pioneer new methodologies and international educational contexts within the broad context of food and nutrition security.

My talk will highlight three issues. Firstly, I will elaborate on the cultural ecology for food preference under variable conditions, particularly in low-income settings. Secondly, I highlight the significance of employing interdisciplinary methodologies that allow scientists to co-produce knowledge. Thirdly, I discuss the importance of developing global interdisciplinary networks that pioneer new methodologies and international educational contexts within the broader context of food and nutrition security.

Lastly, I end my talk with my future research vision along the paths of cultural ecology, interdisciplinary methodologies and international educational contexts within the field of rural development.

Fakta
Tid: 2017-10-03 10:30 - 11:30
Ort: Uppsala
Lokal: Undervisningshuset, Sal L
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Kontaktinformation

Elisabeth Pettersson
Fakultetshandläggare
Fakulteten för naturresurser och jordbruksvetenskap, SLU
elisabeth.pettersson@slu.se, 018-67 10 25

Sidansvarig: par.aronsson@slu.se