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PFS0154

Global perspectives on adaptive wildlife management

The course will have three mandatory parts; Part I will be at SLU in Umeå, Part II in South Africa, and Part III again at SLU in Umeå.



Part I will exist of one week during December. This will include a 1 day meeting in Umeå, where students will be informed about and prepared for the field trip. The remaining days of Part I, the students will focus on background reading for the course and preparing a talk about their PhD research, and how it relates to the adaptive management framework. For this task one European student will be teamed-up with one South African student with which they will have to interact during Part I over Skype and prepare a co-presentation that they will give in South Africa.



Part II consists of a 16-day fieldtrip to South Africa in January. This part of the course will be based at the Nsasani Trust educational camp (www.nsasani.co.za) in Skukuza, Kruger National Park. The Nsasani Trust is also a co-organizer of the course. This part of the course will cover a series of themes, focused on comparing Scandinavian and South African wildlife management approaches and issues; e.g., ungulate management (e.g., moose vs. elephant management), large carnivore management (e.g., wolf vs. jackal management), conflicts around land use and local communities (e.g., mining and land/green grabbing), and issues around illegal harvest or culling. Students will be able to learn about these themes in detail and critically analyze them through a series of lectures by the course organizers, local researchers and conservation managers, through diverse group exercises, through workshop-type interactions with local managers and scientists, and through field excursions to a diversity of wildlife systems. Exercises include: (1) presentation of own PhD work, (2) multiple day group exercise where students will critically analyze an adaptive management issue while being able to access literature and interview local lecturers, managers and scientists, (3) present the outcome of this group work to scientists and managers (4) present the outcome at a local primary/secondary school. Throughout all exercises we will team-up European and South African students.



Part III takes place in Umeå in February. The students will be asked to reflect on the field trip and outline what they have learned from this course, in terms of generic skills, but also in terms of contrasting southern versus northern hemisphere adaptive management. Moreover, in groups of 3-4, students will be asked to develop and give a half-day teaching activity within the MSc course Human Dimensions of Fish and Wildlife Management (given at the Department of Wildlife, Fish and Environmental Studies). This should be in the form of interactive teaching forms. This teaching activity will be based on the group exercise that they did in South Africa and they will have some additional preparation time while back in Sweden.



For more detailed information, please visit www.slu.se/ecos-courses

Kursplan

PFS0154 Global perspectives on adaptive wildlife management, 7,5 Hp

Ämnen

Biologi

Utbildningens nivå

Forskarnivå

Förkunskapskrav

Students must be admitted to a doctoral program, ideally in a subject relevant to wildlife management.

Students will have to participate in all parts of the course in South Africa as well as in Umeå.

Each prospective student shall present a brief CV and a motivation of no more than 200 words outlining how this course will benefit their PhD studies. This information will be used to select students on the course, since the number of students able to participate in the course is limited.

Mål

The aim of the course is to provide students with a broader, multidisciplinary, understanding of adaptive and sustainable wildlife management in northern and southern hemisphere systems. The main underlying objective is to train the students’ critical, analytical and out-of-the-box thinking. As a result, they should be better adapted to solving the world’s future wildlife management issues.



Learning outcomes: Upon completion of the course the student should be able to:

- Describe the principles of adaptive management and co-management

- Have a good understanding of some of the core concepts and theories underlying adaptive wildlife management (e.g. governance, conflict mitigation, population and behavioral ecology), originating from different disciplines, including political science and ecology

- Explain and contrast some of the main wildlife management issues in the Scandinavian and South African context

- Discuss and analyze adaptive wildlife management problems at a more general, conceptual level, and develop solutions for these issues beyond species-specific or systems-specific boundaries

- Reflect on the value of an interdisciplinary research approach

- Present & communicate their research at different levels of education (primary school, MSc-level, PhD level), in a multi-cultural setting and to different stakeholders (scientists and managers)

Innehåll

The course will have three mandatory parts; Part I will be at SLU in Umeå, Part II in South Africa, and Part III again at SLU in Umeå.



Part I will exist of one week during December. This will include a 1 day meeting in Umeå, where students will be informed about and prepared for the field trip. The remaining days of Part I, the students will focus on background reading for the course and preparing a talk about their PhD research, and how it relates to the adaptive management framework. For this task one European student will be teamed-up with one South African student with which they will have to interact during Part I over Skype and prepare a co-presentation that they will give in South Africa.



Part II consists of a 16-day fieldtrip to South Africa in January. This part of the course will be based at the Nsasani Trust educational camp (www.nsasani.co.za) in Skukuza, Kruger National Park. The Nsasani Trust is also a co-organizer of the course. This part of the course will cover a series of themes, focused on comparing Scandinavian and South African wildlife management approaches and issues; e.g., ungulate management (e.g., moose vs. elephant management), large carnivore management (e.g., wolf vs. jackal management), conflicts around land use and local communities (e.g., mining and land/green grabbing), and issues around illegal harvest or culling. Students will be able to learn about these themes in detail and critically analyze them through a series of lectures by the course organizers, local researchers and conservation managers, through diverse group exercises, through workshop-type interactions with local managers and scientists, and through field excursions to a diversity of wildlife systems. Exercises include: (1) presentation of own PhD work, (2) multiple day group exercise where students will critically analyze an adaptive management issue while being able to access literature and interview local lecturers, managers and scientists, (3) present the outcome of this group work to scientists and managers (4) present the outcome at a local primary/secondary school. Throughout all exercises we will team-up European and South African students.



Part III takes place in Umeå in February. The students will be asked to reflect on the field trip and outline what they have learned from this course, in terms of generic skills, but also in terms of contrasting southern versus northern hemisphere adaptive management. Moreover, in groups of 3-4, students will be asked to develop and give a half-day teaching activity within the MSc course Human Dimensions of Fish and Wildlife Management (given at the Department of Wildlife, Fish and Environmental Studies). This should be in the form of interactive teaching forms. This teaching activity will be based on the group exercise that they did in South Africa and they will have some additional preparation time while back in Sweden.



For more detailed information, please visit www.slu.se/ecos-courses

Examinationsformer och fordringar för godkänd kurs

Marking scale: Passed / Failed



Pass grade requirements: To pass the course students have to actively participate in all aspects of the course, which includes actively taking part in lectures, group work, workshops, field excursions and discussion sessions. Each student will also be assessed based on the exercises described in the Content section.

Ytterligare information

Part of research school: ECOS, Ecology and society



Pedagogical form: The course will combine a wide range of pedagogical formats, including traditional lectures, flipped classroom activities, field excursions, workshops, self-study and group works.



More information on the course can be found via https://www.slu.se/ecos-courses



The Department reserves the right to cancel the course if there are not more than 5 students who have applied for the course. Students belonging to the ECOS research school have priority to the course.



There is no course fee but students are required to cover costs for travel, accommodation and living while in Umeå and travel + a contribution to accommodation and food for the South African part. Note that there are possibilities to apply for travel grants to cover travel and accommodation expenses.

Ansvarig institution/motsvarande

Institutionen för vilt, fisk och miljö