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BI1295

Sustainable Plant Production - from Molecular to Field Scale

The course offers a synthesis and further deepening of knowledge in plant production research, as well as the integration of different methodologies emplyed in, among others, plant physiology, plant breeding and process-based modeling. The course provides a solid foundation for research in the subject area, but also professional training. The course consists of lectures and compulsory seminars and excercises, as well as a group project. The lectures review the basics of the origin, breeding, physiology and production of cultivated plants, and link them to soil ecology and nutrient dynamics at the field level. The effects of disturbances on plant production and possible improvement strategies are also described, both qualitatively and quantitatively. These aspects are discussed at different organizational levels. In addition, the complexity and multifunctionality of production systems are explored with reference to different systems, focusing on sustainability and the inherent tradeoffs. The lectures provide also an overview of important tools and methods for research. The seminars and exercises train the ability to read scientific literature and extract key information, identify knowledge gaps, and present and compare different points of view. The group work trains the students in different research methods and offers the opportunity of practical applications of the knowledge acquired during the rest of the course. The seminars and exercises include compulsory activities.


Course evaluation

The course evaluation is not yet activated

The course evaluation is open between 2024-05-26 and 2024-06-16

Additional course evaluations for BI1295

Academic year 2023/2024

Sustainable Plant Production - from Molecular to Field Scale (BI1295-40042)

2024-03-20 - 2024-06-02

Academic year 2022/2023

Sustainable Plant Production - from Molecular to Field Scale (BI1295-40051)

2023-03-22 - 2023-06-04

Academic year 2022/2023

Sustainable Plant Production - from Molecular to Field Scale (BI1295-40052)

2023-03-22 - 2023-06-04

Academic year 2021/2022

Sustainable Plant Production - from Molecular to Field Scale (BI1295-40030)

2022-03-24 - 2022-06-05

Academic year 2021/2022

Sustainable Plant Production - from Molecular to Field Scale (BI1295-40031)

2022-03-24 - 2022-06-05

Academic year 2021/2022

Sustainable Plant Production - from Molecular to Field Scale (BI1295-40032)

2022-03-24 - 2022-06-05

Academic year 2020/2021

Sustainable Plant Production - from Molecular to Field Scale (BI1295-40104)

2021-03-24 - 2021-06-06

Academic year 2020/2021

Sustainable Plant Production - from Molecular to Field Scale (BI1295-40103)

2021-03-24 - 2021-06-06

Academic year 2020/2021

Sustainable Plant Production - from Molecular to Field Scale (BI1295-40105)

2021-03-24 - 2021-06-06

Academic year 2019/2020

Sustainable Plant Production - from Molecular to Field Scale (BI1295-40010)

2020-03-25 - 2020-06-07

Academic year 2019/2020

Sustainable Plant Production - from Molecular to Field Scale (BI1295-40011)

2020-03-25 - 2020-06-07

Academic year 2019/2020

Sustainable Plant Production - from Molecular to Field Scale (BI1295-40012)

2020-03-25 - 2020-06-07

Academic year 2018/2019

Sustainable Plant Production - from Molecular to Field Scale (BI1295-40002)

2019-03-26 - 2019-06-09

Academic year 2018/2019

Sustainable Plant Production - from Molecular to Field Scale (BI1295-40003)

2019-03-26 - 2019-06-09

Academic year 2018/2019

Sustainable Plant Production - from Molecular to Field Scale (BI1295-40004)

2019-03-26 - 2019-06-09

Syllabus and other information

Litterature list

BI1295 – Sustainable Plant Production – from Molecular to Field Scale

Course year 2024

Literature list

Notes

  • The literature is listed with reference to the teacher’s initials and session title, in order of occurrence
  • Unless otherwise indicated, all the readings are compulsory. In some cases, supporting readings are also listed, indicated as Further* reading*.
  • All literature will be made available to the students enrolled through the course Canvas page. Files are named based on the first author and year and they appear in the respective session folders.

RG – The scientific method

Grogan P (2005), The use of hypothesis in ecology, Bulletin of the British Ecological Society, 361, 43-45

FS – Sustainable intensification

Finch et al. (2019), Bird conservation and the land sharing-sparing continuum in farmland-dominated landscapes of lowland England. Conservation Biology, Volume 33, No. 5, 1045–1055, DOI: 10.1111/cobi.13316

Further* reading:*

Folberth et al. (2020 The global cropland-sparing potential of high-yield farming. Nature Sustainability, https://doi.org/10.1038/s41893-020-0505-x

Save and grow; A policymaker’s guide to the sustainable intensification of smallholder crop production, FOOD AND AGRICULTURE ORGANIZATION OF THE UNITED NATIONS, Rome, 2011

AM –The concept of sustainability across scales

Clark et al. (2020), Global food system emissions could preclude achieving the 1.5° and 2°C climate change targets. Science, 370, 705–708.

MW - Photosynthesis from scratch to crop production in northern latitudes

Lambers H, Chapin FS III, Pons TL (2008), Plant Physiological Ecology, Springer (part of chapter 2)

Larcher W (2003) Physiological Plant Ecology, Springer, page 111-119

Peltonen-Sainio P, Rajala A, Känkänen H, Hakala K (2009), Improving farming systems in Northern European conditions, in Sadras V and Calderini D (Eds), Crop physiology – Applications for genetic improvement and agronomy

Xu D-Q and Shen Y-K (2002) Photosynthetic efficiency and crop yield, in Pessarakli M (Ed), Handbook of plant and crop physiology, Marcel Dekker

Further* reading:*

OpenStax Biology Chapter 8 Photosynthesis (http://openstaxcollege.org/l/photosynthesis)

Eisenhut M and Weber APM (2019), Improving crop yield, Science

Weih M (2003), Trade-offs in plants and the prospects for breeding using modern biotechnology, New Phytologist

MW - Effects of climate change on crop production

Bonosi L, Ghelardini L, Weih M (2013), Towards making willows potential bio-resources in the South: Northern Salix hybrids can cope with warm and dry climate when irrigated, Biomass and Bioenergy, 51: 136-144

Lavalle C, Micale F, et al (2009), Climate change in Europe. 3. Impact on agriculture and forestry. A review. Agronomy for Sustainable Development, Springer Verlag/EDP Sciences/INRA, 29(3)

Mäkinen H, Kaseva J et al (2018), Sensitivity of European wheat to extreme weather, Field Crop Research, 222: 209-217

GV – Modelling – the basics

Ludwig F., Asseng S. (2010), Potential benefits of early vigor and changes in phenology in wheat to adapt to warmer and drier climates. Agricultural Systems 103, 127–136

Smith and Smith 2007 Environmental modelling - An introduction Oxford Univ Press (Ch 1 and 2)

GV – Modelling – leaf to plant-level

Further* reading:*

Abrahamsen and Hansen (2000) Daisy: an open soil-crop-atmosphere system model, Environmental Modelling and Software 15, 313-330 (only pages 313-317)

PI - Where do cultivated plants come from?

Doebley JF, Gaut BS, Smith BD (2006), The molecular genetics of crop domestication, Cell, 127(7)

Kole C et al. (2015) Application of genomics-assisted breeding for generation of climate resilient crops: progress and prospects. Frontiers in plant science. 6, 563.

Further* reading:*

Klug WS, Cummings MR and Spencer CA Essentials of Genetics (available at the SLU libraries; Ch 3, 21, 22

RG – Integrated Pest Management

Godfray CJ et al (2010) Food Security: The Challenge of Feeding 9 Billion People. Science 327, 812 (DOI: 10.1126/science.1185383

Further* reading:*

Khan Z et al (2014) Achieving food security for one million sub-Saharan African poor through push–pull innovation by 2020. Phil Trans Royal Soc B 369 (1639)

Prinsloo, G., Ninkovic, V., van der Linde, T. C., van der Westhuizen A. J, Pettersson J. and Glinwood R. (2007) Test of semiochemicals and a resistant wheat variety for Russian wheat aphid management in South Africa. Journal of Applied Entomology 131: 637-644

OL/FBÖ – Integrated Pest and Pollinator Management

Lundin O et al (2021) Integrated pest and pollinator management –expanding the concept. Front Ecol Environ 2021; 19(5): 283–291, doi:10.1002/fee.2325

MK – Plant microbe interactions – plant defense

Pieterse et al (2014), Induced systemic resistance by beneficial microbes, Annual Review in Phytopathology 52, 347

Further* reading:*

Han G-Z (2019), Origin and evolution of the plant immune system. New Phytologist 222, 70

MK – Plant microbe interactions – beneficial interactions

Lugtenberg B and Kamilova F (2009), Plant-growth promoting rhizobacteria. Annual Review of Microbiology 63, 541

Finkel et al (2017), Understanding and exploiting plant beneficial microbes. Current Opinion in Plant Biology 38, 155

Further* reading:*

Bhattacharyya PN and Jha DK (2009), Plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR): emergence in agriculture, World Journal of Microbiology and Biotechnology, 28, 1327 (Figures and tables)

SH - Soil microbial nitrogen cycling

Coskun D, Britto DT, Shi W, Kronzucker HJ (2017), How plant root exudates shape the nitrogen cycle, Trends in Plant Science

Philippot L and Hallin S (2011), Towards food, feed and energy crops mitigating climate change, Trends in Plant Science

Further reading

Robertson and Groffman (2014), Chapter 14: Nitrogen transformations, in Eldor P (Ed), Soil Microbiology, Ecology and Biochemistry, Academic Press

MW+POL - Plant nutrient use efficiency across scales

Lopez-Arredondo DL, Sanchez-Calderon L, Yong-Villalobos L (2017), Molecular and genetic basis of plant macronutrient use efficiency: concepts, opportunities, and challenges, Hossain MA et al (Eds), Plant macronutrient use efficiency – Molecular and genomic perspectives in crop plants, Elsevier

Weih M, Westerbergh A, Lundquist P-O (2017), Role of nutrient-efficient plants for improving crop yields: bridging plant ecology, physiology, and molecular biology, Hossain MA et al (Eds), Plant macronutrient use efficiency – Molecular and genomic perspectives in crop plants, Elsevier

AM – Weed biology and ecology

Monaco TJ, Weller SC, Ashton FM (2002), Weed Science – Principles and practices, Wiley (Ch 1 and 2)

DH – Allelopathy

Further* reading:*

Hickman DT et al (2020), Review: Allelochemicals as multi-kingdom plant defence compounds: towards an integrated approach, Pest Management Science, doi10.1002/ps.6076

CML – Sustainable weed management

MacLaren et al. (2020), An ecological future for weed science to sustain crop production and the environment. A review. Agronomy for Sustainable Development, 40:24.

ED – Weed seed predation

Further* reading:*

Daouti et al. (2020), Seed predation is key to preventing population growth of the weed Alopecurus myosuroides. Journal of Applied Ecology, DOI: 10.1111/1365-2664.14064.

FS – Crop rotations and break crop effects

Kirkegaard et al. (2008), Break crop benefits in temperate wheat production. Field Crops Research, Volume 107, doi:10.1016/j.fcr.2008.02.010

Further* reading:*

Reckling et al. (2016), Trade-Offs between Economic and Environmental Impacts of Introducing Legumes into Cropping Systems. Frontiers in Plant Science, doi: 10.3389/fpls.2016.00669

FS – Grain legume production systems

Watson et al. (2017), Grain Legume Production and Use in European Agricultural Systems. Advances in Agronomy, Volume 144, http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/bs.agron.2017.03.003

Zander et al. (2016), Grain legume decline and potential recovery in European agriculture: a review. Agron. Sustain. Dev. (2016) 36:26, DOI 10.1007/s13593-016-0365-y

Course facts

The course is offered as an independent course: Yes The course is offered as a programme course: Plant Biology for Sustainable Production - Master's Programme Plant Biology for Sustainable Production - Master's programme Forest Science - Master's Programme Tuition fee: Tuition fee only for non-EU/EEA/Switzerland citizens: 38060 SEK Cycle: Master’s level (A1N)
Subject: Biology
Course code: BI1295 Application code: SLU-40043 Location: Uppsala Distance course: No Language: English Responsible department: Department of Crop Production Ecology Pace: 100%