SLU news

Seminars: Exploring the power of working together

Published: 20 February 2018
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CBM is giving a new set of seminars in spring 2018: “Seminars in Historical Ecology”. The four seminars will employ historical ecology as an arena for exploring transdisciplinary work. Seminars in Historical Ecology brings together disciplines, research, and perspectives that have much in common but are traditionally pursued alone.

The society is facing challenging complex environmental problems that cannot be solved using only one discipline at a time. Interdisciplinary discussions are crucial in complex problem solving, not the least when it comes to biodiversity conservation.

Historical ecology is neither a discipline nor a theory. It is a research framework for merging many kinds of evidence (e.g., documents, archaeology, ethnography, ecology and a broad array of environmental studies) to reach new understandings about the human-environment relationship. Research is stimulated by new questions, insights, and methods for combining and analysing diverse sources of information. Historical ecology is an emerging field of study that can facilitate interdisciplinarity and generate new understandings.

Seminars in Historical Ecology brings together disciplines, research, and perspectives that have much in common but are traditionally pursued alone. They all have the theoretical background in the book Issues and concepts in historical ecology - The Past and Future of Landscapes and Regions, (ed: Crumley, Westin, Lennartsson), that was published in November 2017.

- Historical Ecology is an interdisciplinary research framework. By doing seminars in Historical Ecology we aim to develop both the research framework itself and get fruitful interactions between researchers from different disciplinary backgrounds, says Anna Westin, associate professor at CBM.

- So join us for thought-provoking lectures and stimulating discussion of common interests!

 

All seminars will be held in SLU campus Ultuna, starting at 13.00.

21 Februry:
Mats Widgren: Landesque capital: a boundary concept?

21 March:
Jesper Larsson, Eva-Lotta Päiviö, Per Lagerås: The Historical Ecology of forests and mountains in times of expansion and regression

10 April:
Anneli Ekblom, John Ljungqvist: The historical ecology of Old Uppsala and its value as a heritage place

2 May:
Ove Eriksson: Human niche construction as a framework for historical ecology

For more information: www.slu.se/cbmseminars


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