Do your Master's thesis at our Department!

Last changed: 29 January 2021
Person tracking fish. Photo.

Do you want to work in forests, in arctic environments, on savannas, or in tropical rainforests? Are you interested in ­historical data, or spatial data such as animal move­ments or distribution of threatened species? Or perhaps you’d rather work in the DNA lab with molecular methods or species determination?

We offer a wide array of Master's thesis in the subjects of Forest Science, Biology, and Environmental Science!

The thesis can be included in the Forestry Programme, in the Management of Fish and Wildlife Master's programme or as an independent course as part of a degree at another university. You can choose either a 30 or a 60 ECTS thesis. Master's thesis are offered all year round.

Our master's thesis connect to the subject areas at the department:

  • restoration ecology
  • animal ecology
  • aquatic ecology
  • molecular ecology

Below you find information on vacant master thesis and links to how the work can proceed. Click on the suggestions below to read more and see the names of contact persons.

 

Vacant master thesis:

Extended consequences of mutation and changes in leaf morphology on arthropod communities and ecosystem processes

Extended consequences of mutation and changes in leaf morphology on arthropod communities and ecosystem processes

Mutations have a strong contribution to genetic variation within plants, jet the broader consequences of plant mutation for ecosystems is not well known. We are seeking a motivated student for a MSc project aimed at exploring how mutation that influence leaf shape in birches also may influence arthropod communities and ecosystem processes.

Student will study arthropod communities in the canopies of mutant and wild-type birches planted in parks across the municipally of Umeå - the City of Birches. For a 60hp project the student will also collect senescent leaf litter from the same birches and conduct decomposition assays in streams.

Extent: 30 or 60 credits

Supervisor: Petter Axelsson

Contact

Petter Axelsson
Researcher Department of Wildlife, Fish and Environmental Studies
petter.axelsson@slu.se, +46907868361, +46793042878

Leaf shape of the mutant Betula pendula

Swedish Polecat Project

Swedish Polecat Project

A polecat in close-upPhoto: Tim Hofmeester, SLU

We are looking for enthusiastic students that want to do their MSc thesis within the "Swedish Polecat" project. In this project, we test a newly developed combination of a camera and hair trap to capture polecats. The overall aim is to develop a methodology to get population abundance estimates for the polecat in Sweden.

Thesis work consists of:

  • Fieldwork in central Sweden
  • Classification of images with the possibility to add the development of automatic image recognition
  • Spatial modelling of polecat abundance or densities

As this thesis topic requires several new skills, it is only available as 60 credit thesis.

Extent: 30 or 60 credits

Supervisor: Tim Hofmeester, Henrik Thurfjell 

Contact

Tim Hofmeester
Researcher Department of Wildlife, Fish and Environmental Studies
tim.hofmeester@slu.se, +46702478842

Henrik Thurfjell
Environmental Assessment Specialist at the Swedish Species Information Centre
henrik.thurfjell@slu.se, +4618-672617, +4673-0402221

Scandcam: Monitoring Scandinavian wildlife with camera traps

Scandcam: Monitoring Scandinavian wildlife with camera traps

Pictures from camera trap

We are looking for enthusiastic students that want to do their MSc thesis within the ‘Scandcam’ project. In this project, we develop new camera trapping methods to study wildlife communities. The overall aim is to develop a system to monitor Swedish wildlife using camera traps.

Specific thesis topics could include:

  • Estimation of predator-prey interactions (red fox and mountain hare)
  • Estimation of correlation between land-use and wildlife occurrence
  • Pine marten population estimation using camera traps

There are possibilities to develop your own ideas.

There are possibilities for doing either a 30 credit (using existing data) or 60 credit (including own fieldwork) thesis.

Extent: 30 or 60 credits

Supervisor: Tim Hofmeester

Contact

Tim Hofmeester
Researcher Department of Wildlife, Fish and Environmental Studies
tim.hofmeester@slu.se, +46702478842

Does covid-19 generate a spatiotemporal refuge from human activity? What happens with moose spatial ecology when tourists do not come?

Does covid-19 generate a spatiotemporal refuge from human activity? What happens with moose spatial ecology when tourists do not come?

In multi-use landscapes, wildlife and humans share the same habitat,
generating human-animal interactions. The covid-19 pandemic led to
recommendations on social distancing and reduced largely the amount of
human travelling, generating a natural control-treatment experiment by
freezing human recreational activities in wildlife habitat.

A concrete examples is moose in Nikkaluokta in the far north of Sweden
(latitude 67), near the mountain Kebnekaise. During normal years, the area
experiences intensive touristic activities year around, in particular during
winter. To study the impact of peaks in anthropogenic activity on the space
use of free-ranging moose, we are therefore looking for a student who is
interested in comparing moose movement behavior and space use during
2020 until today when covid-19 recommendation reduced tourist numbers
largely with moose behavior during previous years. The student will use the
existing dataset on moose GPS-positions, comparing individual behavior
among years, and will link them to digital maps about landscape features
and weather in the area.

Requirements: A motivated student that has good knowledge in R (e.g.,
spatial analyses, data handling), and statistics. The project will be a deskbased study. The project is expected to generate a peer viewed publication in an international journal.

Extent: 60 or 30 credits

Supervisor: Wiebke Neumann

Contact

Wiebke Neumann
Researcher Department of Wildlife, Fish and Environmental Studies
wiebke.neumann@slu.se, +46907868117, +46706349051

Change moose their activity and movement when the weather front changes? And what can this mean when our weather becomes less stable?

Change moose their activity and movement when the weather front changes? And what can this mean when our weather becomes less stable?

Climate forecasts predict considerable changes in air temperatures, annual
precipitation, and more frequent occurrence of extreme weather events
that affect ecological processes1-3. These changes will fundamentally alter
the environmental conditions for large herbivores like ungulates. Coldadapted
ungulates like moose have evolved to meet strong seasonal variations. Extreme weather events and lower climatic stability, however, may challenge this species by exposing them to increased frequencies of heat waves, freeze-thaw cycles, and wetter winters9-11, which affect them both directly (e.g., heat stress) and indirectly (e.g., altered forage access and quality). Advances in sensor technologies now allow quantifying animals’ habitat selection, behavioral states, and energy expenditures during different climatic conditions in their natural setting.

To study the possible ecological impact of lower climate stability on freeranging moose, we are therefore looking for a student who is interested in analyzing moose behavioral response (i.e., movement, activity, energy
expenditures) in relation to changing weather conditions. The student will
use the existing dataset on moose GPS-positions in northern and southern
Sweden and will link them to digital maps about landscape features, as well
as to data on ambient temperature, precipitation and wind.

Requirements: A motivated student that has good knowledge in R (e.g.,
spatial analyses, data handling), and statistics. The project will be a deskbased study. The project is expected to generate a peer viewed publication in an international journal.

Extent: 60 credits

Supervisor: Wiebke Neumann

Contact

Wiebke Neumann
Researcher Department of Wildlife, Fish and Environmental Studies
wiebke.neumann@slu.se, +46907868117, +46706349051

Golden eagle and reindeer interactions: many secrets yet to unveil?

Golden eagle and reindeer interactions: many secrets yet to unveil?

Golden eagles in their nestPhoto: from camera trap, SLU

 

Background

Golden eagles sit at the top of the food chain in the boreal ecosystem and potentially rely equally on scavenging opportunities. Eagles are associated with predation on reindeer calves, however, there is little supporting knowledge on the fine scale movements of eagles in reindeer herding areas as well as individual level differences in foraging tactics between adults and young birds.

Aim

This 60-credit thesis project is aimed at developing a deeper understanding of golden eagle movements in reindeer herding areas.

Requirements: The student is expected to work with existing movement data on eagles and reindeer from Sweden. The student should have a working knowledge of R and GIS. A good ability to write in English is a plus.

Extent: 60 credits

Contact

Navinder Singh
Researcher Department of Wildlife, Fish and Environmental Studies
navinder.singh@slu.se, +46 (0)90 786 8538, +46 (0)70 676 0103

Novel insights into moose behavior and ecology through video footage

Novel insights into moose behavior and ecology through video footage

moose on snowPhoto: from SVT homepage

Background

Moose migrations are a fascinating phenomenon of boreal north that we have extensively studied in scientific research for decades, but also recently witnessed in the popular media through the SVT production “Den Stora Älgvandringen”. The intriguing aspects of the biology of moose revealed by the series provides an inspiring opportunity to increase our scientific knowledge on moose behaviour during migrations through the videos.

Aim

The main aim of this project is to systematically analyse video footage from the “Den Stora Älgvandringen” series to unravel new insights into moose migration behaviour. The project will be based at SLU and carried out in collaboration with the SVT crew and production team.

Requirements

Lots of patience and persistence, quantitative skills in data analyses and statistics, and excellent writing skills.

Extent: 60 credits

Contact

Navinder Singh
Researcher Department of Wildlife, Fish and Environmental Studies
navinder.singh@slu.se, +46 (0)90 786 8538, +46 (0)70 676 0103

Arctic char vs brown trout – what happens with their interaction in a changing climate?

Arctic char vs brown trout – what happens with their interaction in a changing climate?

Arctic char and brown trout are highly valued fish in the mountain area, and they often occur together in lakes. A number of environmental factors can affect these fish, but we see that summer temperatures have increased and that the winter season is becoming shorter, which likely changes the competitive relationship between char and brown trout in favor of trout.

The task is to investigate if changes in species dominance relationships between char and brown trout have occurred in mountain lakes during the last decades. You revisit lakes in the Hemavan-Tärnaby region that have been sampled in the 1960’s. You will perform sample fishing and compare your data to records from the previous sampling to evaluate if and how the populations have changed. You will also perform sampling of benthic invertebrates, zooplankton, water chemistry and light climate, to characterize the lakes. Analysis also include stomach content, isotopic composition of fish, and aging of fish with the help of otoliths.

Field work should be performed during summer 2021 (and/or possibly autumn). Shorter or longer projects (30 or 60 ects) are possible.

Extent: 30 or 60 credits

Supervisor: Karin Nilsson (main supervisor VFM, SLU)

The project is performed in collaboration with Pär Byström (EMG, UMU), Gunnar Öhlund (VFM, SLU), the county board of Västerbotten and Sami villages.

Contact

Karin Nilsson
Researcher Department of Wildlife, Fish and Environmental Studies
karin.a.nilsson@slu.se, ++46907868277, +46702636155

Net fishing in a mountain lakePhoto: Anders Lundvall (left) and Karin Nilsson (right)

 

The sounds of a Madagascar rainforest

The sounds of a Madagascar rainforest

Have you ever wondered what it sounds like in a tropical rainforest?Animals on Madagascar

Sound has long been recognized as an important component of animal communication, but recent studies have used animal-produced sound to look at other aspects of ecology. For example, using sound collected by unattended recorders, researchers can study activity patterns, occupancy, density, species diversity, and even certain behaviours. However, most of the studies using Passive Acoustic Monitoring (PAM) have occurred in northern, temperate areas, leaving much unknown about tropical soundscapes.

Madagascar is home to some of the most unique animal assemblages in the world. With much of these endemic species threatened with extinction, there is an urgent need to develop novel methods to monitor large areas efficiently. Through our partners at Hunter College, City University of New York, we have access to months of rare audio recordings from Ranomafana National Park, Madagascar.

The objectives of this project are to:

  • determine which species we can detect with acoustic monitors over a 24-hour period, and at what time of day we hear them
  • determine if it is possible to use computer programming to semi-automatically detect bird and lemur sounds from the background noise of the recordings.

This is an excellent opportunity to gain experience using innovative technology at the forefront of ecological monitoring.

Extent: 30 or 60 credits (60 credits preferred)

Supervison/Contacts: Sheila Holmes, Tim Hofmeester, Joris Cromsigt

Hunter College collaborators: Carly Batist, Andrea Baden

Contact

Sheila Holmes
Researcher Department of Wildlife, Fish and Environmental Studies
sheila.holmes@slu.se, +46722017849

Biodiversity on pastures and abandoned farm land – the potential of using horses in ecological restoration

Biodiversity on pastures and abandoned farm land – the potential of using horses in ecological restoration

A large part of the biodiversity of plants and pollinators in temperate and boreal zones are associated with open areas created by traditional human land use such as hay-making or cattle grazing. This biodiversity is now declining as a result of land abandonment and intensified farming. In the northern parts of Sweden extensive cattle grazing was commonly applied until the middle of the 20th century. In the last few decades, a decline in the numbers of farms and an increase in the number of horses for recreational use means that the number of horses now exceed the number of dairy cows in Sweden. The fact that many horses are kept under more extensive forms e.g. allowed to graze on abandoned farm land, means that there might also be great potential for horses to act as ecological restoration agents as for example shown by Garrido et al (2019). They showed that introduction of all year grazing by Gotland ponies led to increased biodiversity of both plants and pollinators. However, the question still remains if horses on summer pasture will have the same positive effect on biodiversity and how the grazing regime might be adapted to further increase biodiversity.

The aim with this project is to investigate if and/or under which circumstances horse grazing can create habitat for a multitude and magnitude of plants and pollinators. There will be opportunities to work with butterflies, bumblebees, moths or vegetation. The thesis will include field work with species monitoring in grazed and ungrazed areas in Västerbotten and adjacent counties. Depending on the extent of the work there are possibilities for both 30 and 60 credits thesis.

Extent: 30 or 60 credits

Supervisor: Therese Löfroth

Contact

Therese Löfroth
Researcher Department of Wildlife, Fish and Environmental Studies
therese.lofroth@slu.se, +46907868384, +46722289881

Horses graze on grass The red listed butterfly Lycaena helle
Horses on summer pasture. Photo: Therese Löfroth. The red listed butterfly Lycaena helle (Violett guldvinge). Photo: Magnus Magnusson.

Decadal effects of wildfire and prescribed burning on the ant community structure

Decadal effects of wildfire and prescribed burning on the ant community structure

Trees and ant


Forest fires have largely determined the post-glacial forest dynamics in the boreal region and are regarded as one of the most important boreal forest disturbances. Fires provide suitable habitat and key food sources for many organism groups and alter assemblage composition and densities of species in the soil and on the forest floor. The succession after fire is also different from that after clear felling and prescribed burnings might also differ from wildfires although this is still not evaluated. Because prescribed burning is used as a restoration tool in Sweden the effects are important to evaluate and in this project the comparison with wildfires are extra interesting.

Previous studies have suggested that the dominating mound building wood ants (Formica rufa group) are negatively affected by fire and that other ant species will become more abundant. However, so far the effects of forest fire on ants have only included short term effects and only prescribed fires. In this project natural wild fires as well as prescribed burnings and unburned control sites are included. Ants were sampled in pit-fall traps during 2019.

The aim with this masters thesis is to quantify the long term (>10 years) effects of large scale wildfire and prescribed burnings on the community structure of ants in northern boreal landscapes. Ants constitute an important part of boreal forest biodiversity and because of their interactions with many other taxa they are often considered keystone species or ecological engineers because they contribute significantly to ecosystem function. They also respond strongly to changes in their environment and are consequently good ecological indicators.

The work will consist of lab work with species identification of already collected ants from wildfire and prescribed fire areas and unburned control sites from northern Sweden and Northern Finland. There is also a possibility to collect more data with and mound surveys in the field. The work will be suitable for a 60 credit thesis but 30 credits might also work.

Extent: 60 or 30 credits

Supervisor: Therese Löfroth

Contact

Therese Löfroth
Researcher Department of Wildlife, Fish and Environmental Studies
therese.lofroth@slu.se, +46907868384, +46722289881

Bats as hosts of zoonotic pathogens – potential conflicts between nature conservation and public health

Bats as hosts of zoonotic pathogens – potential conflicts between nature conservation and public health

Background

Bats (order Chiroptera) are the most species-rich and threatened mammalian group in Sweden with nine of 19 in Sweden reproducing species being red-listed. As insectivores, bats are important for limiting the abundance of pest species. Globally, bats are together with rodents the species hosting most zoonotic pathogens. Rabies is one of the most serious disease that bats can spread to humans and antibodies against rabies have also been found in bats in Sweden. Recently, studies in especially South America have revealed that bats also can spread orthohantavirus; a virus group that mainly has been associated with rodents. These viruses can cause hemorrhagic fevers in humans and in Sweden, nephropathia epidemica (NE; Swedish: sorkfeber) is common in northern Sweden. In southern Sweden, a case of NE was diagnosed in 2019; a case that (due to the distribution range of the virus) can’t be caused by rodents. A reasonable hypothesis is therefore that the human case in southern Sweden is caused by bats.

Primary research questions

  1. To which extent are bats in Sweden reservoirs of zoonotic pathogens (viruses and bacteria)?
  2. Do bats in Sweden host orthohantavirus? If yes, can the southern Swedish case of NE be caused by bats?
  3. If bats host zoonotic pathogens – is there a conflict between nature conservation and public health?

Work plan and methods

  1. Thorough literature study
  2. Development of study design
  3. Field study in mainly July including live trapping of bats (blood and saliva sampling), sampling of feces
  4. Laboratory analyses incl. DNA and RNA extractions
  5. Data analyses
  6. Thesis compilation

Extent: Preferably 60 credits (1 year)

Supervisor: Frauke Ecke

Contact

Frauke Ecke
Researcher Department of Wildlife, Fish and Environmental Studies
frauke.ecke@slu.se, +46907868642, +46702636155

To which degree do current moose migrations overlap with the pitfall system from Stone Age?

To which degree do current moose migrations overlap with the pitfall system from Stone Age?

Why do moose in northern Sweden still use the same pathways for their migration between winter and summer range as they did 6000 years ago? Each spring and autumn, moose still pass where we humans have lived since the Stone Age in the mountains and in the coniferous forests below the mountains. In periods, moose have been absent from large parts of the Swedish inland forest. Landscape has changed, we have a different climate, and humans utilize the landscape differently, but why do moose as they did in the Stone Age? Previous research suggest that migration traditions are transferred between female and her offspring. Yet, we still lack in-depth knowledge how landscape formation shapes and makes animal migration pathways predictable – an essential feature for the functionality of a pitfall system.

To improve our knowledge about how landscape features influence moose migrations paths, we are looking for a student who is interested in analyzing moose movement pathways in relation to the pitfall system in northern Sweden. The student will use the existing dataset on moose GPS-positions and will link them to digital maps about landscape features and the distribution of the pitfall system in northern Sweden.

Requirements: A motivated student that has good knowledge in GIS, R and statistics. The project will be a desk-based study. The project project is expected to generate a peer viewed publication in an international journal.

Extent: 30 credits

Supervisor: Wiebke Neumann, Lars Östlund (Department of Forest Ecology and Management, Forest History Unit)

To apply: please send a letter of interest to Wiebke Neumann explaining your suitability for the project. 

Contact

Wiebke Neumann
Researcher Department of Wildlife, Fish and Environmental Studies
wiebke.neumann@slu.se, +46907868117, +46706349051

A watershed approach to boreal forest green infrastructure implementation

A watershed approach to boreal forest green infrastructure implementation

Green infrastructure (GI) is a mainstream EU policy that can be defined as a strategic and operational planning of natural and semi-natural areas that specifically is designed to provide and mobilize ecological connectivity, conservation, ecosystem services and multi-functionality in ecosystems. For boreal landscapes, forests with continuity and other high conservation forest values have a critical role to secure such functions. Recently, detailed mapping of proxy continuity forests (pCF) have been completed for the boreal biome in Sweden. This data can be used to assess spatial network traits, in combination with, e.g., the national land-cover data and data on forests with high conservation values including protected areas and woodland key habitats, etc. This project will focus on mapping and analyzing the spatial distribution of actual and potential forest conservation areas on watershed scale from coastal lowlands to alpine highlands and from river valleys to watershed divides, for one or two main rivers in northern Sweden. Project outcomes will feed into the ongoing work by the County Administrative Boards and the Swedish Forest Agency on regional green infrastructure planning. The analyses will be based mainly on GIS-analyses and literature studies.

The project is suitable for a 30 or a 60 credit thesis. GIS-skills are required. It is possible to arrange more than one thesis on this topic.

Extent: 60 or 30 credits

Supervisor: Johan Svensson, Bengt Gunnar Jonsson, VFM

Contact

Johan Svensson
Researcher Department of Wildlife, Fish and Environmental Studies
johan.svensson@slu.se, +46907868333, +46730216880

Areas of national land-use interest as input to sustainable landscape planning

Areas of national land-use interest as input to sustainable landscape planning

The environmental act (miljöbalken) recognizes a range of different national land-use interests (NI), including e.g. Natura 2000, nature conservation, reindeer husbandry, contiguous mountain landscapes, recreational life and wind energy production. Thus, the NI-framework reflects ecological, socio-cultural and economic priorities. Most NIs are geographically demarcated with a land-use claim that have substantial power in regional and municipal comprehensive planning. However, an evident overlap exists between different NI, also between actually or potentially conflicting interests. With a focus on wind energy production in municipalities as case studies, this project will focus on assessing spatial traits among a selected number of other NIs as a basis for identifying conflict risks but also integration and synergy prospects, as input to multi-objective landscape planning. In addition and depending on the student’s own interest, the analyses can include also, e.g., forestland for forest production or high conservation value forests. Four municipalities are pre-selected (Gällivaare, Åsele, Falkenberg, Uppvidinge) whereof at least two should be included. The final set of municipality case studies will be discussed and agreed as part of the thesis planning process. The analyses will be based mainly on GIS-analyses and literature studies.

The project is suitable for a 30 or a 60 credit thesis. GIS-skills are required. It is possible to arrange more than one thesis on this topic.

Extent: 60 or 30 credits

Supervisor: Johan Svensson, Wiebke Neumann

Contact

Johan Svensson
Researcher Department of Wildlife, Fish and Environmental Studies
johan.svensson@slu.se, +46907868333, +46730216880

Wiebke Neumann
Researcher Department of Wildlife, Fish and Environmental Studies
wiebke.neumann@slu.se, +46907868117, +46706349051

Personality as a driver of pathogen transmission in wild living rodents

Personality as a driver of pathogen transmission in wild living rodents

Background

Emerging infectious diseases are an increasing burden to public health. More than 60% of all emerging infectious diseases are zoonotic (spread by animals) and more than 70% of these originate in wildlife with rodents representing the most important order. Identification of drivers of pathogen transmission among rodents and from rodents to humans is crucial to understand disease outbreaks.

In this context, the personality – boldness, exploration, activity, etc. – of rodent hosts and reservoirs is getting increased attention and is currently one of the hot topics in disease ecology. For example, in horizontally spread infections, we can expect bold rodents to run higher risk of both catching and transmitting pathogens than shy rodents that might avoid contact to conspecifics.

As a model system, you will study the bank vole (Myodes glareolus)-Puumala hantavirus system.

Primary questions

  1. Are there personality features that distinguish infected from non-infected rodents?
  2. What are the personality features of rodents that show indoor-movement and that increase pathogen transmission from rodents to humans?

Work plan and methods

  1. Thorough literature study
  2. Development of study design
  3. Field study including live trapping of rodents, personality tests on rodents and pathogen sampling
  4. Laboratory analyses
  5. Data analyses
  6. Thesis compilation

Extent: Preferably 60 credits (1 year)

Supervisor: Frauke Ecke

Contact

Frauke Ecke
Researcher Department of Wildlife, Fish and Environmental Studies
frauke.ecke@slu.se, +46907868642, +46702636155

Unveiling landscape scale relationships between herbivore browsing and ecosystem structure: Ungulates and Beavers in Riparian ecosystems

Unveiling landscape scale relationships between herbivore browsing and ecosystem structure: Ungulates and Beavers in Riparian ecosystems

How is the recruitment of broad leaved trees affected by habitat use patterns of beavers and ungulates?

In this project, we aim to investigate this question by combining remotes sensing, GIS and field studies that measure browsing patterns along riparian zones in multiple catchments across a latitudinal gradient in Sweden. We aim to achieve a landscape scale perspective of the impact of herbivores on ecosystem structure and function with potential recommendations for landscape and wildlife management.

Skills needed: field work, spatial ecology, GIS, R statistics

Extent: 60 credits

Supervisors: Navinder Singh, Frauke Ecke

Contact

Navinder Singh
Researcher Department of Wildlife, Fish and Environmental Studies
navinder.singh@slu.se, +4690 786 8538, +4670 676 0103

Frauke Ecke
Researcher Department of Wildlife, Fish and Environmental Studies
frauke.ecke@slu.se, +46907868642, +46702636155

Importance of seed morphology for dispersal, predation and germination in dipterocarp trees in Borneo

Importance of seed morphology for dispersal, predation and germination in dipterocarp trees in Borneo

Seed morphology is ecologically important for many plants as it influence the ability of dispersal, germination and regeneration. For example, characteristics of dipterocarp seeds such as wing size and weight of seeds could comprise a trade-off between long dispersal of small seeds with long wings, and high germination potential of large sized seeds. Furthermore, dispersal may also influence density dependence effects on predation.
We know that wing length and seed size can vary among seeds from different
mother trees, which could influence seed dispersal. However, we do not know how strong this affect is and how variation in dispersal influence germination success and the risk of seed predation.

In this project you will travel to Borneo to collect seeds from different mother trees, quantify their variation in seed morphology and test how this variation influence dispersal ability. You will further assess how variation in seed morphology and dispersal influence the possibility for successful regeneration.

The project could be divided on two students collaborating on experiments but working on separate parts of the project. You would need to fund your project via a Minor Field Studies (MFS) or similar funding.

Extent: one 60 credits or two collaborative 30 credits projects

Supervisor: Petter Axelsson, Daniel Lussetti

Contact

Petter Axelsson
Researcher Department of Wildlife, Fish and Environmental Studies
petter.axelsson@slu.se, +46907868361, +46793042878

Daniel Lussetti
Postdoctor at the Department of Forest Ecology and Management
daniel.lussetti@slu.se, +46907868559

 

Illustration seed dispersal

 

 

Page editor: susanna.bergstrom@slu.se